apple vancouverIt just might be about time to cut up the cable subscription.

With more and more tv networks streaming content from their websites, a simple Mac Mini attached to a big screen tv could give you all the content you need – well, except the live sports. And, really, that’s the only reason I’m still on the cable package (Go Pens!).

Movies have now been added to the iTunes Store in Canada meaning no more running to the rental store or using your cable company’s on demand service.

CUPERTINO, California—June 4, 2008—Apple® today announced that movies from major film studios including 20th Century Fox, The Walt Disney Studios, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. Entertainment, Universal Studios Home Entertainment, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. (MGM), Sony Pictures Television International and Lionsgate and Maple Pictures are now available on the iTunes® Store in Canada (www.itunes.ca).

The iTunes Store in Canada features over 1,200 films available for rent or purchase, with titles available for purchase on the same day as their DVD release, including recent blockbusters. iTunes Movie Rentals also features over 200 titles available in stunning high definition, perfect for viewing on a widescreen TV with Apple TV®.

“Canadians have made iTunes the most popular place to find and buy music and TV shows online,” said Eddy Cue, Apple’s vice president of iTunes. “We’re thrilled to give iTunes customers access to over 1,200 movies from major studios to rent or purchase, whether to enjoy at home on their widescreen TV with Apple TV or on-the-go on their iPod.”

With iTunes Movie Rentals, once a movie is rented, it starts downloading from the iTunes Store directly to iTunes or Apple TV, and users with a fast Internet connection can start viewing the movie in seconds. Customers have up to 30 days to start watching it, and once a movie has been started customers have 48 hours to finish it—or watch it multiple times.

That all sounds nice and excellent, but here’s where it goes sideways:

iTunes movies are available at CAN$9.99 for catalog title purchases, CAN$14.99 for recent releases and CAN$19.99 for new releases.

Woah. A little rich there. The big companies still haven’t figured out the economies of the internet. For example, publishing houses still invoice Amazon for eBooks as if they were printed on paper. They have the same wholesale cost as if it was printed, bound, shipped and shelved. An eBook is just one click of an upload, the wholesale cost is approaching zero, but that’s ignored.

Other’s have hypothesized the true value of music online is 5 cents. If music cost a nickel, there would be no piracy, it just wouldnt be worth the stress.

So how much is a new movie worth? $20? Nope. Get it down to $5, please.

That said, get me the live sports, in HD, over the internets and I’m done with cable.

catch the buzz … pass it on.

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